Friday

50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases: Giving leadway



This awkward phrase leads folks far astray down the leeward way. It also makes editors and English teachers want to get the lead out - for real.

Although it’s charitable to give a person the benefit of the doubt, there really is no such way as giving leadway. It’s not about giving someone the lead, as when we might offer someone a head start or a boost.

The correct expression is giving leeway. It means to allow extra freedom, room to move, or time to achieve a desired goal.

Giving leeway can spell smart leadership.

Be sure to follow or bookmark this blog/site,
so you won't miss a single post in the series:
50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases.


Image/s:
Created by this user

Feel free to follow on GooglePlus and Twitter

You are also invited to join this writer's fan page, as well as the Chicago Etiquette Examiner, Madison Holidays Examiner, Equestrian Examiner and Madison Equestrian Examiner on Facebook.

50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases: For all intensive purposes




Talk about overreacting! This idiomatic uh-oh really irks me.

Maybe a person’s purposes are intense, but the real expression pertains more to intentions than to intensity.

For all intents and purposes, proper writing makes an intense impact on readers, and precise speech has a similar effect on listeners.

For all intents and purposes, it’s an issue of credibility, based on correctness. (Oh, that’s intense!)

Be sure to follow or bookmark this blog/site,
so you won't miss a single post in the series:
50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases.

Image/s:
Created by this user

Feel free to follow on GooglePlus and Twitter. You are also invited to join this writer's fan page, as well as the Chicago Etiquette Examiner, Madison Holidays Examiner, Equestrian Examiner and Madison Equestrian Examiner on Facebook.

Thursday

50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases: Extract Revenge




Grr. This phrase is ill-gotten at best.

When revenge hits the mark, it’s not extracted, but exacted.

Extract actually means “to remove,” so extracting revenge might refer to removing vengeance, not applying it. 

Extract can also be a flavoring for culinary purposes. In my kitchen cupboard, for example, I have almond extract, peppermint extract, and vanilla extract.

Right or wrong, revenge aims at exactness, not extraction.


Be sure to follow or bookmark this blog/site,
so you won't miss a single post in the series:
50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases.

Image/s:
Created by this user

Feel free to follow on GooglePlus and Twitter. You are also invited to join this writer's fan page, as well as the Chicago Etiquette Examiner, Madison Holidays Examiner, Equestrian Examiner and Madison Equestrian Examiner on Facebook.

 

Friday

50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases: Expresso



Coffee is king for many folks. Designer coffees may be particularly prized, especially when consumers can pick up steaming cups at drive-through express windows.

Plenty of coffee lovers choose espresso, a particularly potent blend. But it is not expresso, even in the express line.

Personally, I'd rather have a pot of tea. But that's just me. 

Be sure to follow or bookmark this blog/site,
so you won't miss a single post in the series:
50 Mistreated Words and Desecrated Phrases.

Image/s:
Created by this user

Feel free to follow on GooglePlus and Twitter. You are also invited to join this writer's fan page, as well as the Chicago Etiquette Examiner, Madison Holidays Examiner, Equestrian Examiner and Madison Equestrian Examiner on Facebook.